31 August 2016

Minister sings praises of a NZ education in Japan and Korea

In late August, Minister Steven Joyce visited Japan and Korea to advance New Zealand’s business, innovation and education interests. Most of all, it was a great occasion to celebrate the friendship between our countries.

Haka
Students from Ikubunkan Institute of Education perform a haka

In late August, Minister Steven Joyce visited Japan and Korea to advance New Zealand’s business, innovation and education interests. Most of all, it was a great occasion to celebrate the friendship between our countries.

The visit kicked-off in Tokyo, where ENZ joined the Minister to meet with Toshiei Mizuochi, Japan’s new State Minister for Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, to discuss opportunities in science and innovation. Minister Joyce highlighted New Zealand’s flexible qualification framework and expertise in vocational education, which Minister Mizuochi welcomed.

Following this, Minister Joyce went to Busan and Seoul, Korea, where he visited the Centre for Creative Economy and Innovation (CCEI) and talked about opportunities for working on film projects with Auckland. This includes a September workshop organised by Screen Auckland and AUT to teach staff and students from Busan-based Dongseo University more about film.

Minister Joyce also met with Lee Joon-shik, Korea’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Education, to explore ways to grow the education relationship between Korea and New Zealand. This included the possibility of more Korean-language teaching and learning in New Zealand schools.

CCEI edit3

CCEI, from left to right: Cecily Lin, Acting Regional Lead, ENZ; CCEI staff; John Riley, Deputy Head of Mission; Clare Fearnley, NZ Ambassador; Minister Joyce; Cho Hong-geun, Head of CCEI; Ryan Freer, New Zealand Trade Commissioner

In each country, Minister Joyce hosted a reception for local guests including school teachers, agents and representatives from tertiary institutions. At the Tokyo reception, 13 high school students from Ikubunkan Institute of Education performed a haka and waiata for the Minister they had learned while studying in New Zealand. At the Seoul reception, guests were joined by Korean rappers Microdot and Sanchez who spoke with affection of their time studying in Auckland. Both evenings provided a wonderful opportunity for Minister Joyce to promote New Zealand’s education and lifestyle, the importance of an education relationship between our countries and to introduce the Prime Minister’s Scholarship for Asia.

“Education cooperation is an important way of developing a closer relationship between our countries, and encourages us to discuss and cooperate on issues of mutual interest and benefit,” said Minister Joyce.

The ENZ student fair will be held in Japan on 8 October in Fukuoka, and Tokyo on 9 October.

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